What we pay attention to, and how that affects what we choose to keep or throw away, be they materials, ideas, or specifics of the natural environment, can change the stories we tell and the possibilities we allow. I engage our human and environmental predicament using the incongruent beauty of the sacred found.
Wellspring StudioArtist StatementSculptureWall SculptureExhibitionsThe Water CouncilYellow Dirt TestimonyVerde River



Old things, every day things – long used, or used and discarded – possess a resonance of memory and time; they are rich with meaning, nostalgia and reference. Following the lead of materials that at first seem unrelated – rust and lace, glass and stone, metal and rubber – I trust the art making process to reveal immanence in the ordinary. 

My mother and grandmother were both accomplished needle workers.  I am drawn to the textural possibilities of fiber arts; both for the sensibility of the process and the emotional connection to the work of women artists over time.






My life has been shaped by experiences in beloved wild places. With a background in environmental science, education, and advocacy, I am always interested in processes at work in the more than human world – movement, cycles, shadow, equilibrium, entropy, and interconnection. I draw on insights from both science and art to better understand the beauty we live in and encourage a story of wholeness still within reach.  

I split my time between studios in Prescott, Arizona, and Bellingham, Washington.
All photographs by Christopher Marchetti
Wellspring StudioArtist StatementSculptureWall SculptureExhibitionsThe Water CouncilYellow Dirt TestimonyVerde River

Wellspring StudioArtist StatementSculptureWall SculptureExhibitionsThe Water CouncilYellow Dirt TestimonyVerde River